Behavioral interview questions are a norm in almost every field. They gauge how you will cooperate with customers and co-workers to lead to a successful outcome. These questions are meant for the hiring manager to get an idea of the candidates thought process in tough situations. 

Answering behavioral interview questions in the right tone and with the right attitude is just as important as the words used in your answer. The tone of your voice can either prove your response to be accurate or just what the hiring manager is expecting to hear. These are also questions that give hiring managers a better understanding of how a candidate is going to work with the entire team in potentially challenging situations. 

Common Behavioral Interview Questions

Here is a list of example behavioral questions you may get in your next interview:

  • Talk about a time you had a difficult client and what you did to obtain a positive outcome. 
  • Have you ever been on a management team where the team members disagreed? How did you remedy that situation?
  • What are some examples of prioritization skills you have used to complete a project with a strict deadline?
  • How have you used your leadership skills to manage multiple responsibilities?
  • Tell me about a time you had to handle a high stress job.
  • Have you ever dealt with a challenging situation with a co-worker?
  • Give an example of how you had to communicate effectively with other team members to complete a long-term project.
  • How many projects have you had at the same time and how did you prioritize them?

How to Answer Behavioral Interview Questions

This is more than just telling the tale and citing specific examples of challenging times in the workplace. Answer these questions in a tone that is confident and honest. Stay focused on the question being asked and try not to go on a tangent into a different topic that deviates from your strong answer. 

Not all behavioral interview questions are going to leave off on a positive note. A great answer is going to be measured in the learning that came from whatever the situation in the previous role entailed. Sometimes that answer isn’t going to be pretty, but that is all part of the relevant experience hiring managers are looking for in the role. Remember, these responses are meant to allow the interviewer to gain insight into your communication skills, time management skills, and other unique skills you posses. 

You can prepare your sample answers based on the job posting. There may be some verbiage in the job description that mentions a need to solve problems or handle multiple projects at once. Knowing these key facts about the position will allow you to prepare your example answer to any question. 

You can check out more examples of different interview questions here.